Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Truthful Tuesday: Romey Edition

Today's confession is that I've given up on Romey. Sometimes you have to know when you've spent all you can spend. Not just monetarily but emotionally too.
Romey hasn't been sound since he came to me. I've given him lots of time, lots of rehab, and lots of vet and body work visits. Only to finally discover he had an old fracture way up high on the right hind. My vet can't fix that. We tried injecting the SI to see if that could help him compensate better. Which it did. For about three weeks. I had the vet back out when Romey decided he was no longer interested in trotting for me. (Let alone canter!) Romey also has kissing spine. And while Doc didn't think that was causing Romey's refusal to work, I can't help but wonder if it's contributing. Add in his not so delightful personality and I finally had to admit this just isn't going to work.

So then what? I love my little farm, but it's far from perfect. My turnout is barely adequate for my working horses, let alone one who isn't going to be ridden. So keeping him at my place would be unfair. Not an option. Romey may not have been a good match for me, but he was a war horse on the track. He's more than earned a decent place to live his life. So I started researching retirement farms. I had no idea the scope of what was out there! They can range anywhere from $150 per month to over $1000. But I didn't really want for him to go somewhere that would pull his shoes, throw him in a field and forget about him. So we're talking in the $450 to -$650 range per month. Not horribly unreasonable, but with Badger in training, it would definitely strain my ability to buy groceries and put gas in my car. (And I'd have to quit shopping cold turkey. Can you imagine?!) The other factor? Romey is eight years old. Other than having a creaky skeleton, he's quite healthy. And he's a little aggressive. All those things mean that his horse will happy and comfortably live in retirement for at minimum 15 years. You guys. That's approximately $90,000.
I like to think of myself as a responsible horse owner. I do the best I am able for my tall kids (the short ones too actually), and if I can't keep them, I find the best home I can for them (not the short kids, they always stay. ALWAYS). But financially, I wasn't sure I could swing this for Romey.

At this point, I was basically thinking I should just give up riding and nurse these animals I have through old age as best I can at my farm. But finally, I decided to reach out to his last owner. As they have a no slaughter cause in their contracts, I figured they must know of affordable, decent places to retire these horses. Luckily, this was a great decision. In talking with his last human, she asked what my vet had thought about him having a light work job. My vet very much thinks he can have a job, and that he doesn't necessarily need to retire fully. But he does need some more vet work and will require some maintenance. Previous human has many people come to her for light work horses and/or walking trail horses. Either of these jobs could be great for him. So she agreed to take him back (I pay shipping and a small processing fee). She will give him the winter off, consult with the vets at the University of Kentucky, and then find an appropriate home for him.
I'm relieved that this is all working out, and I hope things go to plan. While he didn't work out for me, I still have a spot in my cold little heart for him. I'm sad that he's leaving, but I'm hopeful he'll find a home that he's happier in. He's such a handsome guy, and while kind of a bitey jerk, I really do think he's more playful than mean. He'll be leaving next week sometime. Oddly enough, I'm really going to miss him.

Safe travels Romes. I'll miss you buddy.



21 comments:

  1. Glad the old owner stepped up. :-) Sounds like a good solution for everyone.

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    1. Me too. It's a big weight of my shoulders.

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  2. So glad you found a viable solution for him! Kudos to you for all you did to try to make it work, and kudos to his old owner for being willing to help him find a nice job for him. Sounds like the happiest ending possible ☺

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    1. Thank you! I'm glad it's hopefully going to work out for him.

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  3. Wow, talk about best case scenario! So nice to see former (and current!) owners doing right by their horses.

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    1. Agreed! I didn't really expect her to take him back. I've had him almost two years. But so grateful that she will.

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  4. That's a great solution for him. I'm sorry that it didn't work out like you hoped.

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    1. Thank you. Yeah, I'm disappointed. But horses though, right?

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  5. It sounds like Romey will be able to have a long and (hopefully) happy life packing someone around on trails!

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  6. It's so hard to know when to fold so you can't play another hand later. Glad you came to a decision and kudos to you for finding a good place for Romey to land <3

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    1. It's so tough! I feel like a bit of a failure/bad horseman after two failed ones in a row. But this is kind of what can happen when you acquire without meeting them first.

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  7. While I was so sad to read this, I KNOW you made the right decision and I am so happy you could get the best outcome possible for him. Best of luck Romey!

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    1. Thanks! I'm a little sad too. But it's definitely for the best for both of us.

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  8. Sounds like you abdolutely did the best you can for him- and are now helping him find the right situation for him. Seriously, good for you!

    Kelly @ hunkyhanoveriab

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    1. Thank you! Hopefully I've done right by him.

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  9. It's tough to decide when to throw in the towel. And the emotional costs can far exceed the financial ones - although so. much. money. I'm glad you found him a soft landing that won't cost you for 15 more years. I've been curious purely because I had a similar situation, although my horse was in better physical shape. I ended up rehoming him and I miss him terribly, but it's also a huge relief!

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    1. It really is so hard. I'm sad about it. He's a pain in the rear, but I'm really going to miss him. I'm glad things worked out with yours too!

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  10. I'm sorry it didn't work out, but it sounds like you found a really great new home for him.

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    1. Well it's temporary there, but I think they'll find him a great permanent home at least.

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  11. An emotional wringer for sure (I too hate throwing in the towel) but so awesome the previous owner could take him back.

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